More Canadians want accessible and aesthetic buildings in their communities

A new poll shows only 47 per cent of Canadians admire the architecture where they live

Canadians are more likely to report that their community's development reflects what developers want, not what the residents want, a new poll shows | Photo: Raimund Koch/The Image Bank/Getty Images

A new Angus Reid study found that more Canadians are seeking decision-makers and people in development to ensure that public spaces are created and accessible for everyone.

A strong majority of those surveyed said that accessibility, aesthetic beauty and sustainability should be priorities when developing new buildings in their communities. Also, three-quarters noted that culture and heritage should be a key consideration in building developments.

But when it comes to the planning and execution of buildings, responses were divided.

Half of respondents said that developments in their communities were poorly planned, and only 47 per cent said they admire the architecture.

The study found that Canadians are more likely to report that their community’s development reflects what developers want, not what the residents want.

And non-white residents said they often feel ignored when they take part in planning consultations.

Meanwhile, Canadians are widely supportive of having a figure like a chief architect to rely on the quality of design decisions would lie.

Overall, Canadians, especially in Metro Vancouver, said their communities are developing too quickly.